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Ten Biggest Myths About Black History Print E-mail
That a people, once proud members of mighty African tribes, who had gone through slavery, pestilence, discrimination, segregation, and even natural disaster were able to survive and prevail against the odds is a prime example of the indomitable tenacity of the human spirit. Such a painful journey would have destroyed lesser beings but the story of the transplantation and transformation of the African American community has been one of the greatest flights of the human spirit in recorded history.
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Famous African American Men Print E-mail

Benjamin Banneker (1731-1806) Mathematician, Inventor: Born on November 9, 1731 near Elliott City, Maryland, Benjamin Banneker was one of America's greatest intellectuals and scientists. Benjamin Banneker was an essayist, inventor, mathematician, and astronomer. Because of his dark skin and great intellect he was called the "sable genius." Benjamin Banneker was a self-taught mathematician and astronomer.

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Civil Rights Timeline Print E-mail

Separate drinking fountains for whites and blacks. "Colored balconies" in movie theaters. Seats in the back of the bus. Soldiers called out to protect little children who were trying to go to school. It may be difficult to believe these were examples of conditions in America less than 40 years ago. The struggle to change these conditions, and to win equal protection under the law for citizens of all races, formed the backdrop of Martin Luther King's short life.

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Black Inventors and Inventions Print E-mail
The following African Americans are responsible for either inventing, or improving on the invention of, a wide variety of items. From Dr. Charles Drew to Garrett A. Morgan, the inventions of African Americans have played a large role in AMERICAN history.
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Harlem Renaissance Print E-mail
The Great Migration: The end of the American Civil War in 1865 ushered in an era of increased education and employment opportunities for black Americans. This created the first black middle class in America, and its members began expecting the same lifestyle afforded to white Americans.
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Black History Month Print E-mail
February is Black History Month. In 1915, Dr. Carter G. Woodson and Rev. Jesse E. Moorland co-founded the Association for the Study of Negro Life and History (ASNLH). Their goal was to research and bring awareness to the largely ignored, yet crucial role black people played in American and world history.
The following year, Woodson published and distributed his findings in The Journal of Negro History.
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Black History Month:Make it All Year Print E-mail

The following piece is a paper written by Paul Hill, Jr. It was written in conjunction with the celebration of Black History Month. Paul Hill is presently the director of East End Neighborhood House in Cleveland, Ohio and is a former Black History Teacher at Dyke College and Cuyahoga Community College.

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Why African History? Print E-mail

Africa and its people are the most written about and the least understood of all the world's people. This condition started in the 15th and 16th centuries with the beginning of the slave trade and the colonialism system. The Europeans not only colonized most of the world, they began to colonize information about the world and its people. In order to do this, they had to forget, or pretend to forget, all they had previously known about the Africans. They were not meeting them for the first time; there had been another meeting during Greek and Roman times. At that time they complimented each other.

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Black History Test Print E-mail
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African Americans Print E-mail
The use of the taxonomic category African American, either in public or health or other disciplines, fundamentally reflects the historic and contemporary systems of racial stratification in American society. The term "African American," as a categorical descriptor, includes many different segments of the American population referred to as "black" or Americans of sub-Saharan African ancestry. It is also a product of the group self-definition process in which African Americans have historically engaged as an expression of identity, power, defiance, pride, and the struggle for human rights.
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